youngbadmanbrown:

S is for side eye
"I’m so glad we have a sisterness about us."
Happy Birthday Maya!

"I’m so glad we have a sisterness about us."

Happy Birthday Maya!

queermuseum:

Queer African American Women and the History of Marriage 
This photo and headline accompanied an article from the October 15, 1970 issue of Jet magazine. They reveal that long before the recent struggle for marriage equality began,  African American women who love women have engaged with the institution of marriage and have fought to make it their own.
Edna Knowles, on the left, and Peaches Stevens were wed in Liz’s Mark III Lounge, a gay bar on the South Side of Chicago, “before a host of friends and well wishers.” The article ended by noting, “although the duo has a type of ‘marriage license’ in their possession, the state’s official marriage license bureau reported it had no record of their license.” This ending serves to remind Jet readers that Knowles and Stevens’ union was not legitimate in the eyes of the state, as does the use of quotes around the word “married” in the headline.
However, decades prior to this bold public display of queer affection, African American female couples in New York strategized alternative ways to obtain marriage licenses in the 1920s and 30s:
“Marriage ceremonies were held with large wedding parties which included several bridesmaids, attendants, and other wedding party members. Actual marriage licenses were obtained by either masculinizing the first name, or having a gay male surrogate obtain the license for the marrying couple. These marriage licenses were placed on file with the New York City Marriage Bureau.” - Luvenia Pinson, “The Black Lesbian: Times Past-Time Present,” Womanews, May 1980  p. 8.
Also during the 1930s, popular performer Gladys Bentley was making a living singing bawdy tunes and playing piano late into the night at various clubs all over New York, including one named after her.

Bentley married her white girlfriend in Atlantic City in a ceremony to which she invited friends in the entertainment industry:
“Columnist Louis Sobol remembered Bentley coming over to his table one night and whispering, ‘I’m getting married tomorrow and you’re invited.’ When Sobol asked who the lucky man was to be, she giggled and replied, ‘Man? Why boy you’re crazy. I’m marryin’ ——’ and she named another woman singer.” - Eric Garber, “Gladys Bentley: The Bulldagger Who Sang the Blues,” Out/Look, Vol. 1, No. 1, Spring 1988, pp. 52-61.
These examples show some of the various ways queer African American women have created public rituals to express their relationships and have therefore insisted on their rights to full citizenship, many decades prior to the current struggle for marriage equality. 


- Cookie
 

queermuseum:

Queer African American Women and the History of Marriage 

This photo and headline accompanied an article from the October 15, 1970 issue of Jet magazine. They reveal that long before the recent struggle for marriage equality began,  African American women who love women have engaged with the institution of marriage and have fought to make it their own.

Edna Knowles, on the left, and Peaches Stevens were wed in Liz’s Mark III Lounge, a gay bar on the South Side of Chicago, “before a host of friends and well wishers.” The article ended by noting, “although the duo has a type of ‘marriage license’ in their possession, the state’s official marriage license bureau reported it had no record of their license.” This ending serves to remind Jet readers that Knowles and Stevens’ union was not legitimate in the eyes of the state, as does the use of quotes around the word “married” in the headline.

However, decades prior to this bold public display of queer affection, African American female couples in New York strategized alternative ways to obtain marriage licenses in the 1920s and 30s:

“Marriage ceremonies were held with large wedding parties which included several bridesmaids, attendants, and other wedding party members. Actual marriage licenses were obtained by either masculinizing the first name, or having a gay male surrogate obtain the license for the marrying couple. These marriage licenses were placed on file with the New York City Marriage Bureau.” - Luvenia Pinson, “The Black Lesbian: Times Past-Time Present,” Womanews, May 1980  p. 8.

Also during the 1930s, popular performer Gladys Bentley was making a living singing bawdy tunes and playing piano late into the night at various clubs all over New York, including one named after her.

Gladys Bentley

Bentley married her white girlfriend in Atlantic City in a ceremony to which she invited friends in the entertainment industry:

“Columnist Louis Sobol remembered Bentley coming over to his table one night and whispering, ‘I’m getting married tomorrow and you’re invited.’ When Sobol asked who the lucky man was to be, she giggled and replied, ‘Man? Why boy you’re crazy. I’m marryin’ ——’ and she named another woman singer.” - Eric Garber, “Gladys Bentley: The Bulldagger Who Sang the Blues,” Out/Look, Vol. 1, No. 1, Spring 1988, pp. 52-61.

These examples show some of the various ways queer African American women have created public rituals to express their relationships and have therefore insisted on their rights to full citizenship, many decades prior to the current struggle for marriage equality. 
- Cookie

 

(via quirkyblackgirls)

mining the Schomburg Digital Library

//salome

On Stop and Frisk

image

An interesting piece from the New Yorker’s Photo Booth blog. Especially compelling seeing so many mothers. “I was never told not to take pictures, but other people have been. I think that, as a white woman, I am treated differently.” - Nina Berman, photographer.

Adds an interesting element to the conversation, and I appreciate Berman’s acknowledgement of her positionality and the privilege afforded her. 

Here’s a good link to the Center for Constitutional Rights’ report, “Racial Disparity in NYPD Stop and Frisks” http://ccrjustice.org/learn-more/reports/report%3A-racial-disparity-nypd-stop-and-frisks

And, artist Michael Paul Britto’s performance piece, “The Suspect Wore” http://www.brittofied.com/?p=502

-sonia


Photo credit (c) Nina Berman. Read more: http://www.newyorker.com/online/blogs/photobooth#ixzz2OsET8aOZ

Sistah Storyteller: Laura Mvula

British soul singer and songwriter Laura Mvula released her debut album Sing to the Moon this month featuring the gorgeous songs "She" and "Green Garden" (videos below). With a vibrant and purifying voice, she sings empowering stories of strength, compassion and love. Equally as moving and gorgeous are the music videos for the two singles that I believe eloquently capture the emotion of these songs.

|eden|

StaceyAnn Chin lays down what it means to be a girl and a woman, and embraces it wholeheartedly. Her words and performance are powerful and unrelenting. Nonetheless, I struggle with her pain. More so, I struggle with that pain we so often associate with being a woman. Sure, our “pussy” is celebrated in StaceyAnn’s prose, and it is honored for doing all the heavy lifting (like, making Jesus Christ and all), but when will it be free of violence or misunderstanding? And can I celebrate my womanhood without acknowledging that place between my thighs that so often defines me? Can I celebrate my womanhood without acknowledging oppression? Or is womanhood spawn from an oppressive past and continuing agressions? 

-Leila

tonite! see you there

xoxo

womenlovetheworld:

Women Love the World: A three day festival and fundraiser celebrating women artist-activists and their contributions to bettering our world community.

We are proud to announce Women Love the World (WLTW), a festival co-curated by Caits Meissner, Karla Rodriguez and Lehna Huie, featuring a visual art exhibition, art for social change panel, short film screenings, live music, poetry and on-site activism engagement. Held during Women’s History Month, on the evenings of March 20-22, 2013 at LaunchPad Brooklyn, WLTW is dedicated to the journeys of women artists who live as activists, healing our world daily.

Participating artists include:

Art Exhibition: Monique Schubert, Jessica Ann Peavy,
Micaela Anaya, Kameelah Janan Rasheed, Zozan Kotan, Tschabalala Self, Akeema-Zane and Lehna Huie

Film Screenings & Music: Lisa Russell, Nikyatu Jusu, Maya Azucena, Circa 95, Shira E., Esmeralda Love and DJ Chela.

Poetry Readings: Brooklyn Poet Laureate Tina Chang, Tonya Foster, Cheryl Boyce Taylor, Angel Nafis, Tahani Salah and Caits Meissner.

Read more about the event here, or click through the links above!

sheroxlox:

KING is back…

*In the Meantime* 

This will be on heavy rotation ALL day! 

Lead Vocals by Amber Strother and Anita Bias
Background Vocals by Amber Strother, Anita Bias and Paris Strother
All Instruments, Arrangement and Production by Paris Strother with Strings by Tom Lea
Artwork by Donald Ely

Mark your calendars! The Sistah Friends Project is planning another Women of Power brunch for Saturday, April 6th from 12-4pm.  We are looking forward to more food, laughter, and conversation as we step into Spring. Our featured speaker will be visual artist Shani Peters who will share experiences from her recent outbound artist residency in Seoul, South Korea and lead discussion. Learn more about Shani, here. Email SFP at sistahfriendsproject@gmail.com for more information.  
Love and Light,
Sistah Friends Project