sheroxlox:

*give your daughters difficult names. give your daughters names that command the full use of tongue. my name makes you want to tell me the truth. my name doesn’t allow me to trust anyone that cannot pronounce it right.* ~ Warsan Shire 

sheroxlox:

*give your daughters difficult names. give your daughters names that command the full use of tongue. my name makes you want to tell me the truth. my name doesn’t allow me to trust anyone that cannot pronounce it right.* ~ Warsan Shire 

Warsan Shire

"For Women Who Are Difficult To Love"

Pat Cleveland

Paris Vogue, 1990

blackcontemporaryart:

Maria Magdalena Campos-Pons
Identity Could be a Tragedy,1995

blackcontemporaryart:

Maria Magdalena Campos-Pons

Identity Could be a Tragedy,1995

Crown Heights, Brooklyn native Susan Smith McKinney Steward was the first African American woman to earn a medical doctorate in New York, and the third in the United States. She ran a private practice, co-founded the Brooklyn Women’s Homeopathic Hospital and Dispensary, and presented her paper “Colored American Women” at the 1911 Universal Races Conference in London. Looking back, one could say this conference was an early attempt at practicing anti-racism, yet it’s amazing to even scan the table of contents and preface of the published papers presented at the conference. While it is difficult to get past the idea that these discussions were steeped in a general knowledge and acceptance that race was a scientific phenomenon rather than a social construct, the members of the congress intended to solve their “issues” and strive for equality regardless. I’m still not convinced that this conference is something to celebrate (afterall, who organized it and who benefited from it truly in the end?), but these organizing efforts also inspire and require self-reflection, particularly when we tend to practice organizing tactics in our own silos and in the cyber-sphere.
Still it remains, Susan was awesome, and we love her :) 
Leila

Crown Heights, Brooklyn native Susan Smith McKinney Steward was the first African American woman to earn a medical doctorate in New York, and the third in the United States. She ran a private practice, co-founded the Brooklyn Women’s Homeopathic Hospital and Dispensary, and presented her paper “Colored American Women” at the 1911 Universal Races Conference in London. Looking back, one could say this conference was an early attempt at practicing anti-racism, yet it’s amazing to even scan the table of contents and preface of the published papers presented at the conference. While it is difficult to get past the idea that these discussions were steeped in a general knowledge and acceptance that race was a scientific phenomenon rather than a social construct, the members of the congress intended to solve their “issues” and strive for equality regardless. I’m still not convinced that this conference is something to celebrate (afterall, who organized it and who benefited from it truly in the end?), but these organizing efforts also inspire and require self-reflection, particularly when we tend to practice organizing tactics in our own silos and in the cyber-sphere.

Still it remains, Susan was awesome, and we love her :) 

Leila

shashamusic9:

nu video shot by the homie iveezy. 

blackfashion:

Photographed by Namsa Leuba for WAD magazine
#Blackfashion Facebookt: @BlackFashionbyj

blackfashion:

Photographed by Namsa Leuba for WAD magazine

#Blackfashion Facebook
t: @BlackFashionbyj

specialnights:

Early 1900s, racist imagery was widely used in consumer products even Valentine’s Day cards and relied on caricatures and stereotypes to create humor. Harvey Young, Jr., an Associate Professor at Northwestern gave a talk on racist V-Day ephemera and had this to say:

They capture in a material object the racial discourse occurring at the moment…You can really get a sense of how common and everyday and widely accepted these cards were. It gestures to this past moment when racism was more apparent in society.

specialnights:

Early 1900s, racist imagery was widely used in consumer products even Valentine’s Day cards and relied on caricatures and stereotypes to create humor. Harvey Young, Jr., an Associate Professor at Northwestern gave a talk on racist V-Day ephemera and had this to say:

They capture in a material object the racial discourse occurring at the moment…You can really get a sense of how common and everyday and widely accepted these cards were. It gestures to this past moment when racism was more apparent in society.

specialnights:

Early 1900s, racist imagery was widely used in consumer products even Valentine’s Day cards and relied on caricatures and stereotypes to create humor. Harvey Young, Jr., an Associate Professor at Northwestern gave a talk on racist V-Day ephemera and had this to say:

They capture in a material object the racial discourse occurring at the moment…You can really get a sense of how common and everyday and widely accepted these cards were. It gestures to this past moment when racism was more apparent in society.

specialnights:

Early 1900s, racist imagery was widely used in consumer products even Valentine’s Day cards and relied on caricatures and stereotypes to create humor. Harvey Young, Jr., an Associate Professor at Northwestern gave a talk on racist V-Day ephemera and had this to say:

They capture in a material object the racial discourse occurring at the moment…You can really get a sense of how common and everyday and widely accepted these cards were. It gestures to this past moment when racism was more apparent in society.

(via weformlikevoltron)

sistahfriend taja’s band throw vision just released their awesome debut album, IN I

download it for FREE here: http://throw-vision.bandcamp.com

(album art by ivan forde, http://workdaily.tumblr.com/)

-sonia

handclapmovement:

New Brooklyn indie-soul act Throw Vision have just put out their debut album IN I, and we want to focus on the amazing single from the set, “Nonah”.  When you fade in to a song with handclaps, and dazzling examples of breathtaking swooning, it was a pretty easy call that I was going to love this. 60’s soul melodies are the immaculate star, but their is a warming psych-pop background, that makes this song feel both timeless and fresh. I guess this all makes sense when you’re inspired by both Nina Simone and Animal Collective. The percussion adds that slight addition of energy, that keeps this at a just-below shuffling pace, making it more appropriate for a stroll in the park. 

Listen and download to the rest of In I here.